Allegra, Spanish Barb Mustang at Wind Horse Foundation needs Donations for Pigeon Fever Infections

Allegra starting treatments at Loomis Basin Equine

Allegra, Spanish Barb Mustang at Wind Horse Foundation needs Donations for Pigeon Fever Infections.

Read this blog for updates on Allegra:  Allegra, Spanish Barb Mustang at Wind Horse Foundation needs Donations for Pigeon Fever Infections.

Wind Horse Foundation has 12 Spanish Barb Mustangs and 5 mustangs in the herd came down with Pigeon Fever. Wind Horse Foundation, 501c3 non-profit, is asking for some support to pay for veterinary bills as a result of this outbreak. Allegra is at Loomis Basin Equine Medical Center and will stay there for 10 days. Collodial silver treatment has just started on Allegra and the other 4 horses back at the ranch.

ALLEGRA IS NOW AT THE LOOMIS BASIN EQUINE MEDICAL CENTER
PHONE 916.652.7645 TO MAKE A CREDIT CARD PAYMENT OVER PHONE.
TELL THEM IT IS FOR ANNE-MARIE PINTER’S HORSE: ALLEGRA.

or

Send a check to:
Wind Horse Foundation
6061 Summit Dr.
Garden Valley, CA 95633

Donations are tax deductible.

 

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Kaimanawa Wild Horses at Risk in New Zealand

New Homes needed before the end of May 2012

New Homes needed before the end of May 2012

Occupy for Animals

More than 170 Kaimanawa horses face the slaughter house if homes cannot be found for them until end of May!

Published 19 Apr 2012

More than 170 Kaimanawa horses face the slaughter house if homes cannot be found for them in the next month.

The slaughter is part of the Department of Conservation’s (DOC) bi-annual culling of the breed, aimed at keeping the population below 300 to protect the fragile environment they inhabit.

Kaimanawa Heritage Horses spokesman Elder Jenks says put in good homes, many of the horses flourish.

“Once handled, Kaimanawa wild horses have exceptionally temperaments and are delightful ponies to interact with,” he says. “They’re flourishing in pony clubs around New Zealand as great all-rounders and are highly sought after as jumpers, eventers and games ponies.”

Mr Jenks says Kaimanawa horses were once seen as feral but the reputation of the breed is quickly improving.

“The horses are won by TLC, not by force,” he says.

“They are like a Labrador dog; give them a little love and they give you 10 times back.”

Mr Jenks owns nine Kaimanawa horses and is urging people to take on horses before the cull.

The breed was first reported in the central North Island’s Kaimanawa Ranges more than 130 years ago.

They gained protection by the Government in 1981 after their numbers shrunk to 174, but by 1997 the population had ballooned to 1700.

DOC now aims at maintaining a steady number of around 300 horses.

This year 479 horses have been counted in the area, meaning 179 need to be culled.

The excess horses have until the end of May to find a home.

PLEASE CLICK HERE to leave a comment on the page (source) if you can help.

Please SHARE WIDELY. Thank you!

— with Annie MondKaren MayfieldLouise Du ToitStephanie DyerJudy LevyCatherine RitlawKylie ThomasMia Kate,Bob OortEd AbdoolPaola GhidottiSteve BestPriya TuliPaola Pecora,Shamalatha RaoMira Pantazopol IordanescuMithila NaiduYana Stevens and Laura Kett.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE:

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN ADOPTING A WILD KAIMANAWA, PLEASE CONTACT Simone Frewin  Email Address:  simone@kaimanawaheritagehorses.org.


New Homes needed before the end of May 2012

New Homes needed before the end of May 2012